Rake angle in scooter

A few months ago, my wife mangled her big toe on a beach in Florida. They were interchangeable to my wife, who simply needed something to help her navigate the Mall with ease. So she hopped on a Lime out of necessity, while I snagged one in solidarity because a. Even with massive crowds swarming the monuments and memorials during peak cherry blossom season, the device made for a smooth, seamless, and inexpensive ride through the city. It only took a few brisk blocks for me to become a believer, despite knowing electric scooters come with a bit of baggage.

San Francisco, for example, temporarily booted Birds from its streets, while residents of big cities have blasted the e-scooter startups with myriad safety, parking, and littering complaints. Check out the Bird Graveyard Instagram account to see what happens when angry riders abandon—or beat the crap out of—the scooters, or watch this recent South Park clip.

Still, the appeal of the humble electric scooter is obvious: Traffic sucks. Russakow is the CEO of Boostedwhich made its bones developing Boosted Boards: high-performance, vehicle-grade electric skateboards for last-mile transportation. But it is the first vehicle-grade version. But ours can.

rake angle in scooter

After my fleeting love affair with the Lime in D. Think: more function than flash. It feels really clean and stable. But when you spread it far out, a little bit of motion translates to a much smaller angle. The tires, meanwhile, are also wider than comparable scooters.

Plus, the tires have a motorcycle-inspired tread—good for extra traction in wet conditions—and are filled with enough air to take much more abuse than any other pneumatic tire found on a scooter or bike, Ulmen says. To fold it up, all you have to do is unlock the latch on the steering tube and step on the rear fender brake, which doubles as spring mechanism for the steering tube to collapse back. The Rev achieves a top speed of 24 mph—downright blazing compared to the approximate max 15 mph that Bird, Lime, and similar scooters reach on roads.

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The powertrain packs precision-tuned acceleration curves, which let you instantly turn on the jets 0 to 20 mph in 4. To control your speed, just roll your thumb on the built-in, single-input throttle wheel on the handlebar. Scroll to the left to speed up and the right to slow down. In addition to the electric braking system, the Boosted team also tacked on two redundant mechanical brakes for additional safety. Squeeze the bike-like brake on the handlebar for backup, or step on the rear fender to push the back wheel and slow down.

Ulmen knew he needed to design the battery to absorb current quickly. So the Rev uses premium lithium cells in an IP57 waterproof, automotive-grade casing and employs anti-propagation technology. After getting the lowdown from Ulmen and Russakow, it was finally time to test the Rev. To start the scooter, you simply press the home button to power up and pick your speed range, depicted on the LED display.

You can lock in one of three modes before you take off: slow-ish top speed: 12 mphfast-ish 18 mphand oh shit!Rake angle of various scoots? Fri Aug 17, am quote. I've been reading Proficient Motorcycling great book! I've got a fly, thinking about up-sizing to a sportcity or a gts. For some reason, this is left out of all the specs listed on-line that I've been able to find.

Also, a related question. It seems like smaller wheeled scooters handle a bit "twitchier" than those with larger wheels.

Am I missing something? Does the contact patch perhaps move laterally more quickly with a given angle of turn on a smaller tire? Thanks for any help, and sorry if this is too nerdy a topic for this forum jerry. Jerry all of those things make a difference. The force helps the scooter stay going straight ahead.

Thus making the larger wheeled scooter feel a bit more stable and the smaller wheeled scooter feel more nimble. Rake and trail seem to be given almost always in motorcycle specs, and also in bicycle specs. Never with scooters.

I'd guess that the rake and consequently the trail for scoots are much nearer bikes than motorcycles, because of the flicky handling. Smaller wheel diameter will affect trail. Trail will be less with the same rake, and the steering will be "faster", "flickier", "less stable".

This is why "touring" bikes have a more laid-back head angle and "racing" bikes have a higher head angle. With their relatively tiny-diameter wheels and [looks like] high head angle, scooters must have very little trail.

Can anyone find info on scooters? Here's another fun stat to mess with your head. The Harley Dyna series has 29 degrees of rake and 4. They are known as the good handling "big twins". The Big Fat Touring models feature 26 degrees of rake! How do they do that, and what effect do think it has on handling? All Content Copyright by Modern Vespa. All Rights Reserved. Modern Vespa is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.

What is Rake Angle in Cutting Tool? Names, Effects, Functions & Values

Fri Aug 17, am quote I've been reading Proficient Motorcycling great book! Fri Aug 17, am quote Jerry all of those things make a difference. Fri Aug 17, am quote Rake and trail seem to be given almost always in motorcycle specs, and also in bicycle specs.

Fri Aug 17, am quote Re: Rake angle of various scoots? Smaller wheels feel "twitchier" in the same way that a Ducati or Ninja feels twitchier than a Harley. It is a good thing. Those numbers may tell you in advance how one cc sportbike will handle at the racetrack vs another cc sportbike, but they say nothing about how a Vespa will feel vs a Burgman.

Just go ride them and see which one you like best. Recently, a fellow Harley rider told me he was going to increase the trail on his bike to 2 inches.Variations of this question from reader Bruno Izzo can be found, at one time or another, in every motorcycle publication.

rake angle in scooter

What we want to do here is clarify the vague, and shave off the fuzzy. Motorcycle suspension systems can be very complex, and involve numerous variables such as wheelbase, weight, ride height, tire size, suspension sag, and engine placement, in addition to rake and trail. This is particularly so with competition motorcycles, but these factors also come into play with standard street motorcycles, just to a lesser degree.

However, to understand trail, first you need know about rake. Rake is often called fork angle, but that is a misnomer. Rake is the angle, in degrees, that the steering head of the frame—not the forks—is tilted back from the vertical. For example, the rake angle on all the Harley-Davidson Touring models is 26 degrees.

Generally speaking meaning there are exceptions the greater the rake angle, the more stable the motorcycle is at higher speeds. To better understand this, visualize a motorcycle with 0 degrees of rake, with the forks straight up and down, perpendicular to the ground. These bikes were stable at speed, but required a couple of ZIP codes worth of territory in order to make a U-turn. Understanding trail is a little less easy. Imagine aiming a laser beam down through the center of the steering head, keeping its angle parallel to the steering head.

Where the laser beam hits the ground, mark as A. Now, hold your laser directly above the centerline of the front axle, keeping the beam perpendicular to the ground. Where the beam hits the ground, mark as B.

Measure the distance between A and B; that is trail. On the Harley Tourers, that measurement is 6. For example, while those wildly raked forks might give excellent high-speed stability they are impractical for normal use. To maintain good stability and proper handling with the fork angle being in the normal range from about 22 degrees to about 32 degrees a certain amount of trail is designed in.

Generally—again, there are exceptions—the more trail a motorcycle has, the more stable it is. Achieving stability, lightness, and balance is a serious engineering problem, and we have only touched on the barest of its essentials here. This is the bible on the subject.Variations of this question from reader Bruno Izzo can be found, at one time or another, in every motorcycle publication. What we want to do here is clarify the vague, and shave off the fuzzy.

Motorcycle suspension systems can be very complex, and involve numerous variables such as wheelbase, weight, ride height, tire size, suspension sag, and engine placement, in addition to rake and trail.

This is particularly so with competition motorcycles, but these factors also come into play with standard street motorcycles, just to a lesser degree.

Understanding Motorcycle Rake and Trail

However, to understand trail, first you need know about rake. Rake is often called fork angle, but that is a misnomer. Rake is the angle, in degrees, that the steering head of the frame—not the forks—is tilted back from the vertical. For example, the rake angle on all the Harley-Davidson Touring models is 26 degrees.

Generally speaking meaning there are exceptions the greater the rake angle, the more stable the motorcycle is at higher speeds.

rake angle in scooter

To better understand this, visualize a motorcycle with 0 degrees of rake, with the forks straight up and down, perpendicular to the ground. These bikes were stable at speed, but required a couple of ZIP codes worth of territory in order to make a U-turn.

Understanding trail is a little less easy. Imagine aiming a laser beam down through the center of the steering head, keeping its angle parallel to the steering head. Where the laser beam hits the ground, mark as A. Now, hold your laser directly above the centerline of the front axle, keeping the beam perpendicular to the ground. Where the beam hits the ground, mark as B.

Measure the distance between A and B; that is trail. On the Harley Tourers, that measurement is 6.

Rake Angles

For example, while those wildly raked forks might give excellent high-speed stability they are impractical for normal use. To maintain good stability and proper handling with the fork angle being in the normal range from about 22 degrees to about 32 degrees a certain amount of trail is designed in. Generally—again, there are exceptions—the more trail a motorcycle has, the more stable it is.

Achieving stability, lightness, and balance is a serious engineering problem, and we have only touched on the barest of its essentials here. This is the bible on the subject. A Google search will tell you how to find it. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Northeast U.Do not rely on measures for exact accuracy. We know you were day dreaming about sex when the triangles were floating around the blackboard and you were doodling motorcycles while the teacher was explaining geometry and tangents.

RAKE: The angle in degrees of the steering neck from vertical. TRAIL: The distance defined by the vertical line from axle to ground and the intersection of centerline of the steering neck and ground. Usually adjustable in 3, 5, 7 degrees of rake. Put a mark on the floor at that point. Then place the tape parallel to the steering neck, following the angle of the steering neck all the way up to the floor.

Put a mark here also. Now measure the distance between the two marks and you have your trail measurement. It should read between 2 and 4 inches.

Note: If your bike is equipped with a rear suspension, have someone sit on the seat when you make the measurements to simulate your actual riding condition. It will easily develop a fatal high-speed wobble.

The bike will handle easily at both high and low speeds. Flowing smoothly through curves without swaying or wobbling. If you use a very fat rear tire, you should keep the trail as close to 4 inches as possible. It will seem almost too steady. You will have trouble balancing the bike at lower speeds or on winding roads. It will feel generally sluggish and clumsy.In the simplest terms, Rake and Trail are the major force in determining the steering and handling characteristics of our motorcycles.

Rake might best be described as the steering component that makes a motorcycle directionally stable, while Trail can be thought of as the component that restores stability when it is disturbed. Generally speaking means there are exceptionsthe greater the rake angle, the more stable the motorcycle is at higher speeds.

More precisely, the smaller the rake angle, the more agile the bike is. If you take a look at a chopper and a superbike, you will be able to notice the rake difference between the two. Imagine a motorcycle with 0 degree of rake, with the forks straight up and down, perpendicular to the ground. Ride something like much over walking speed and you will be facing your face to the ground. Now consider the other extreme, forks kicked out like those old school choppers. These bikes were stable at higher speeds but requires comparatively high amount to force to make a U-turn.

To better understand this, let us take Yamaha R15 and Bajaj Avenger, as both motorcycles are from distinctly different categories, they have their own characteristics. Coming to Bajaj Avenger, it has a major difference in its rake angle compared to Yamaha R15, this is influenced by the good high-speed stability of the Avenger, but making a U-turn requires a high steering effort. Jul 26, Copyright - All Rights Reserved.Rake angle is a parameter used in various cutting and machining processes, describing the angle of the cutting face relative to the work.

There are three types of rake angles: positivezero or neutraland negative. Recommended rake angles can vary depending on the material being cut, tool material, depth of cutcutting speedmachine, setup and process. This table summarizes recommended rake angles for; single-point turning on a lathedrilling, millingand sawing. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about cutting geometry.

The Boosted Rev Is an Absolute Blast

For steering geometry, see Bicycle and motorcycle geometry. For the mathematical definition, see Rake angle. This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources.

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